Where & How To Get Your NYC COVID-19 Vaccine

Photo by Mat Napo on Unsplash

Photo by Mat Napo on Unsplash

New Yorkers in Phase 1a & 1b ARE NOW eligible,those groups include the following:

For more details about the eligible groups, check here.

Find A NYC Vaccination Center Near You And Schedule Your Visit

The NYC COVID-19 Vaccination Finder is designed to facilitate the process for New Yorkers to find convenient provider locations administering COVID-19 vaccines and schedule appointments for vaccination.Prior to receiving the vaccination, you must complete the New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Form. This form can be completed online and you will receive a submission ID, or you can fill out the form at your vaccination site. Individuals being vaccinated must bring proof of eligibility to the vaccination site. This may include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status.

Click Here For The NYC COVID-19 Vaccination Finder

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