CDC: Everyone Ages 18 and Older Should Get a Booster Shot

CDC Approves Boosters For Everyone Over 18

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Monday, Nov. 29, that everyone over the age of 18 should get a booster shot.

From the CDC:

Choosing Your COVID-19 Booster Shot

You may choose which COVID-19 vaccine you receive as a booster shot. Some people may prefer the vaccine type that they originally received, and others may prefer to get a different booster. CDC’s recommendations now allow for this type of mix and match dosing for booster shots. 

IF YOU RECEIVED
Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna

Who should get a booster:
Everyone 18 years or older
When to get a booster:
At least 6 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination series.
Which booster should you get?
Any of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States.


IF YOU RECEIVED
Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen

Who should get a booster:
Everyone 18 years or older
When to get a booster:
At least 2 months after completing your primary COVID-19 vaccination.
Which booster should you get?
Any of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States.

Scheduling Your Booster Shot

If you need help scheduling your booster shot, contact the location that set up your previous appointmentIf you need to get your booster shot in a location different from where you received your previous shot, there are several ways you can find a vaccine provider. 

What to Expect during and after Your Booster Shot Appointment

  • Bring your CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record card to your booster shot appointment so your provider can fill in the information about your booster dose. If you did not receive a card at your first appointment, contact the vaccination site where you got your first shot or your state health department to find out how you can get a card. 
  • You may experience side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. These are normal signs that your body is building protection against COVID-19.
     

From New York State:

UPDATE: New Yorkers who are 18 years and older and received the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna initial vaccine series at least six months ago or the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine at least two months ago are eligible for their booster dose. CDC and NYSDOH encourage eligible New Yorkers to get their booster dose, especially those over the age of 50 and others with underlying conditions. 

FDA fact sheets for recipients and caregivers on each vaccine are available: Pfizer-BioNTech/CominartyModernaJohnson & Johnson.

COVID vaccines are widely available at pharmacies, local health departments, clinics, Federally Qualified Health Centers and other locations across the state. Visit Vaccines.gov to find appointments near you or contact your local pharmacy or provider.

To schedule an appointment directly at a New York State-run site, go to New York State's vaccine scheduler and follow the instructions. Walk-in appointments are also accepted at New York State mass vaccination sites for all eligible individuals.

FIND APPOINTMENT AT STATE-RUN VACCINE SITES

FIND APPOINTMENT AT ALL OTHER SITES

Author
Dr. Mark L. Meyer Dr. Meyer graduated from Haverford College with a Bachelor of Science, High Honors, in cellular and molecular biology, Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude. He attended the Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed a categorical residency in Internal Medicine, served for one year as an Emergency Department attending physician, and held the title of Clinical Instructor in the Department of Surgery. During this time, Dr. Meyer obtained a J.D. from the Yale Law School, concentrating on medical ethics, scientific research law, and FDA law. He then completed a fellowship in Cardiovascular Diseases at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he obtained Level 3 Nuclear Cardiology training.

You Might Also Enjoy...

How to Stay Hydrated in a Heat Wave

Many countries across the globe are facing dangerously high temperatures. Here’s what to do to stay safe. Large swaths of the United States, and many parts of Europe, China, and other areas worldwide, are facing dangerous levels of heat.

Five Ways to Help Reduce Every Day Stress

Some stress is part of everyone’s life. But there are times when the daily demands of the job or school, the complications of home life, the pressure of living in the New York metropolitan area, and the state of the world.

Want to Reduce Stroke Risk? Sit Less. Move More. Do Chores.

A new study from San Diego State University, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA Network Open, found that doing lighter intensity daily activities such as household chores can significantly reduce the risk of stroke.